Citrus Infused Vinegar

Citrus Infused Vinegar

Galaxy Gas Nitrous Infused Recipes

Servings: 2-4Servings
Prep time: 00:15

Just a few squishes of vinegar are enough to brighten up a dish. But here is something extra and unique – the freshness of lime, grapefruit, lemon, and orange peel from the Galaxy Gas Nitrous Recipe: Citrus Infused Vinegar. The citrus oils extracted from the peels add a tangy twist to the aroma of vinegar and make it an ideal topping for salads. You can also add this vinegar to add some sour notes to your cocktails. The citrus peel will alter the flavor profile depending on the quantities and proportions you add to the mix. Therefore you can tailor your citrus-infused vinegar according to your personal preferences or the requirement of your recipe. Usually, 2 – 4 peeled citrus are sufficient to give enough flavor to 1.5 cups of vinegar. When you place the peels in the bottle of vinegar, it may take many days to extract their citrusy flavor. However, with the help of Galaxy Gas Whipped Cream Dispenser, you can make the infusion within a few minutes.

Ingredients

Instructions

  1. Keep the white wine vinegar at room temperature or slightly warm.
  2. Scrub the skin of all the fruits thoroughly, then rinse and dry.
  3. With the help of a peeler or zester, peel the fruits gently, making sure that the pith doesn’t come along.
  4. Pour the vinegar in the Galaxy Gas Whipped Cream Dispenser and add the peels.
  5. Charge it with one Galaxy Gas Whipped Cream Charger and gently shake for about 20 – 30 seconds.
  6. Let the cream whipper sit for at least one minute.
  7. Cover the top of the cream whipper with a towel and vent it.
  8. Open the siphon and let the bubbling stop.
  9. Pour the vinegar through a strainer and funnel it into a bottle.
  10. Let it rest for five minutes, then cover the lid and label.

Tips

Benefits of using citrus-infused vinegar in salad dressings:
The dressing you pour on your salad should be ideally as healthy as the salad. There is no point in ruining a green salad loaded with nutrients by topping it with a store-bought salad dressing. They often contain refined sugars, artificial flavors, and poor-quality oils. The cherry on the top may even have some emulsifiers or preservatives to extend their shelf life.
Making interesting infusions with your vinegar lets, you create your own very deliciously refreshing salad dressings. When you create your salad dressing from scratch, you have the surety that it only contains fresh ingredients free from trans-fats, preservatives, and unnecessary calories.
Adding vinegar to a salad dressing enhances the flavor of salads and makes them more flavorful. Vinegar also improves digestion and increases the absorption of nutrients in the body. Citrus acids from the infused peels increase the vitamin and mineral content of the vinegar and make it rich in antioxidants.
How can you use this vinegar?
Vinegar is a common and versatile ingredient that is an indispensable part of many recipes. The citrus notes cut down some of the sourness and spice of the vinegar and make it more delicious. Here are the three main uses of vinegar, and you can use your citrus-infused vinegar for the following purposes.
To brighten your dishes:
The sourness or acidity of wine vinegar adds brightness to flavors in many dishes such as marinades, mayonnaise, and other salad dressings, sauces, soups, and ketchup. Vinegar also adds balance to rich dishes and makes them more palatable.
To alter the texture of foods:
The acid content of the vinegar influences the physical and chemical structure of many foods. Most often, the acids break down the structure of proteins. This property makes vinegar an important constituent of marinades as it imparts a tenderizing effect to meats and fish. When added to milk, it separates the milk protein casein in solid milk curds from the liquid whey. Then the curds are used for making cottage cheese and many other recipes.
For pickling:
Vinegar’s acidity inhibits microbial growth and extends the shelf life of foods by a process referred to as pickling. The food is soaked in a solution that contains salt, sugar, and vinegar until it changes its color and flavor. Then it can be kept in sterile jars for a few months or years.

 

After you've used this Citrus Vinegar Recipe to as your salad dressing, incorporate our Infused Shredded Beef with Tangerine Foam Recipe for the dinner of a lifetime!

Photo by Catherine Attwood